📚 Skinwalker by Faith Hunter

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Jane Yellowrock, Book 1

Goodreads⎮Reviewed Feb. 2018

Narrator: Khristine Hvam
Length: 14 hours 34 minutes
Publisher: Audible Studios⎮2010

Synopsis: Jane Yellowrock is the last of her kind – a skinwalker of Cherokee descent who can turn into any creature she desires and hunts vampires for a living. But now she’s been hired by Katherine Fontaneau, one of the oldest vampires in New Orleans and the madam of Katie’s Ladies, to hunt a powerful rogue vampire who’s killing other vamps.


4★ AudiobookSkinwalker was one of three Paranormal audiobooks I purchased during a recent Audible ‘First-in-series’ sale (the best type of sale, tbh), the other two being Nice Girls Don’t Have Fangs and Halfway to the Grave. Despite being the first I heard, Skinwalker was also the last I finished. But get ready for a plot twist because I think Skinwalker was my favorite.

I should clarify that I mean two things by “favorite”: 1) It was the one I disliked the least and 2) It’s the series I would probably continue on with before the others. Skinwalker has more potential than the others (in my opinion, of course) and I would therefore be the most curious to see where the series goes. Of the three, it also gave me a distinct Mercy Thompson vibe, which was precisely what I was looking for. Just look at the cover. That could practically be Mercy.

Let’s break it down: Mercy is a mechanic. Jane Yellowrock built her own motorcycle from scrap parts. Mercy and Jane are both of Native American descent. They are both shape shifters who don’t really know what they are and don’t fit in with their respective packs. There are many more similarities where world building is concerned, but Hunter’s writing style just can’t touch that of Patricia Briggs. In fact, Skinwalker sort of felt like listening to fan fiction from the Mercy-verse.

But I’m not even mad about it (though I can see why people would be). Honestly, I’m so desperate for more Mercy Thompson that I’ll try anything that is even slightly similar to it. I purchased Skinwalker because of these similarities, not in spite of them. I mean, something has to sustain me until Briggs’ next release.

However, I am disappointed that Hunter’s world didn’t seem to be as immersive as I was hoping for, nor was Jane as dynamic of a character. I appreciated the idea of Jane’s absorption of Beast and their subsequent, albeit reluctant, cohabitation and cooperation. But something about it just didn’t click with me. The writing style used for Beast’s POV was offputting and hard to follow. The incomplete sentences made the overall flow of events seem choppy and disconnected.

Speaking of disconnection, something in the writing (I’m not sure what) prevented me from connecting with these characters and fully sinking into their world. However, I’m not completely certain that 100% of this disconnection can be blamed on the book, which is why I’m open to continuing on with the series. The potential is definitely there and I’ll need to hear more of this series to know if more of the problem lies with it or me. Some series take longer to get into than others and I’m really hoping to fall in love with this one with a little extra effort.

Narration review: As soon as I saw that this series was narrated by Kristine Hvam, I clicked ‘purchase’. No hesitation, whatsoever. I’ve heard countless titles from Hvam and have loved them all.She did an adequate job of voicing Beast, which couldn’t have been easy. Hvam’s narration is playing a huge part in my openness to hearing more of this series. I’m always open to hearing more of Kristine Hvam. ♣︎

$ Available at Audible/Amazon

2 Comments

  1. Very nice review. I’ve read up to book 7 so far in the series, but do have to say I’ve been course about the audiobooks for the series. I do agree with you on Jane and Mercy. I like Jane she’s kinda like Mercy and I love women who are strong on their own, independent, and yet they still have strong feelings about the people they come to care about.

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